Breast Cancer, Chemotherapy, Coping with Cancer, expander, Lymphovascular Invasion, mastectomy, moms and cancer, Oncotype, reconstructive surgery, Tamoxifen, Uncategorized

Kid, you’ll move mountains!

Since he was 18 months old, Nathan has been in school. IMG_1508For the majority  of this time, he has been in an early childhood public education program. After his graduation ceremony (see earlier blog), I drafted the following letter to the district’s superintendent.


Early childhood education is more than teaching. As the parent of a preschooler, believe me, I know.

The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry ~ Robert Burns

After interviewing at least dozen preschools to find our family’s best fit, I was disheartened. I almost cancelled our last appointment at Child Development Center. Thankfully I didn’t. It was apparent that the director created a different kind of environment. Parents were conversing with ease because teachers were engaged, not just supervising. Nathan and I were welcomed into a place where we immediately felt at home. After concluding the tour, I completing the necessary paperwork to begin school after the Thanksgiving break. I told Nathan it was time to leave, and then the unthinkable happened. He wanted to stay! Nathan wanted to stay with his new friends and listen to the teacher read books. After rearranging schedules our start date was changed. He began his CDC journey that very day.

Change is never easy, especially for preschoolers who require consistency and routine. Over the past two and a half years, Nathan has progressed through multiple classroom environments and adapted to various teaching styles. The school’s director recognizes that pushing children outside of their comfort zone is key to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development. She guides and encourages social and academic growth by remaining the constant variable through each these transformational milestones. Every morning, she is outside welcoming parents and children by name, making personal connections, and providing an extra set of hands on the playground. This intentional construct fosters independence, encourages community relationships, and builds trust between school and family.

I often find myself exiting the car for afternoon pickup thinking of the laundry list of items on my to-do list for the night. This mindset quickly turns 180o after passing through the CDC playground gates. The ebullient atmosphere is contagious. Instead of rushing home, parents are on the playground talking with each other while their children continue to play. Nathan asks me if he can stay longer to play with his friends, which gives me a chance to play with the other moms too. This speaks volumes to the climate of neighborhood bonding that is an uncommon trait of today’s working parents.

 

Kid, you’ll move mountains! ~ Dr. Seuss

I call Nathan my “hummingbird” because he is in constant movement. He is not an easy kid. Learning always involves touching things, and sometimes (oftentimes if we’re being honest here…) breaking them. He requires a lot of patience, redirection and positive reinforcement. The school’s director has genuinely embraced his exuberance. She has placed Nathan with teachers who have a knack for kids with bottomless cups of energy. In this environment he has thrived academically and grown into a compassionate, emotionally conscience little boy.

I am not an easy mom. I am also in constant movement. I too require a lot of patience and positive reinforcement. Never more so than on November 1, 2014. I was diagnosed with grade 3, stage 2 invasive ductal carcinoma. Every mother’s worst nightmare. This is when the true spirit of “family and community support” is put to the test. The director passed with flying colors. She respected my privacy while ensuring there were minimal interruption to my hummingbird’s daily routine; his cup of energy was always brimming with cheerful abandonment. One and a half years later, I am not cured but I am in remission. Without support from the CDC, my road to recovery would have been littered with boulders instead of pebbles. My son now proudly tells people that his mom is cancer free and I proudly tell people that I couldn’t have made it through without the CDC.

He is ready for kindergarten. I’m not… but he is.

 

Imagination will get you everywhere ~ Albert Einstein

I hope that we continue to encounter teachers like the ones at the CDC who can imagine my little boy’s future of “being the change”. This can only happen with guidance from forward-thinking, innovative leaders who recognize the needs of 21st century learners. Leaders who stoke the flames of imaginary steam engine trains that are brimming with flying machines, friendly monsters and talking dogs. Leaders who make sure to listen with eyes and ears. And leaders who give “one more chance” five more times.

 

And all the colors I am inside have not been invented yet ~ Shel Silverstein

Of these things I am certain because… for better or worse… I am Nathan’s mom.

2016-05-05 16.57.17

Standard

3 thoughts on “Kid, you’ll move mountains!

  1. K Schochet says:

    Melissa- this is really beautiful! I think it is my favorite of all your wonderful posts. So nice to hear of good things in your and Nathan’s lives! xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s